Science

Purpose of Study/Rationale

We intend to provide a high-quality science education which establishes the foundations for understanding the world through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics. Science has changed our lives and is vital to the world’s future prosperity, and all pupils are taught essential aspects of the knowledge, methods, processes and uses of science.

 

Through building up a body of key knowledge and concepts, pupils should be encouraged to recognise the power of rational explanation and develop a sense of excitement and curiosity about natural phenomena. They should be encouraged to understand how science can be used to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave, and analyse causes.

 

 

The curriculum is designed to develop knowledge and skills that are progressive, enabling children to deepen their understanding of both the world and the ways in which things work.

 

‘Working scientifically’ specifies the understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science for each year group. It should not be taught as a separate strand and therefore ‘working scientifically’ is embedded within the content of biology, chemistry and physics, focusing on the key features of scientific enquiry, so that pupils learn to use a variety of approaches to answer relevant scientific questions.

 

These types of scientific enquiry include: observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping; comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations); and researching using secondary sources. Pupils should seek answers to questions through collecting, analysing and presenting data.

 

Beginning in the Early Years, children explore and investigate the world around them to develop their knowledge and skills, using cause and effect.

 

In Key Stage One, children begin to ask simple questions and recognise that they can be answered in different ways. They observe closely, using simple equipment, and perform simple tests. This helps them to gather and record data to answer questions.

 

In Lower Key Stage Two, children ask relevant questions and use different types of scientific enquiry to answer them. They set up simple practical enquiries, comparative and fair tests and use their results to draw simple conclusions. Children make predictions for new values, suggest improvements and raise further questions.

 

In Upper Key Stage Two, children plan and decide their own questions to develop a line of enquiry to answer questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary. They use test results to make predictions to set up further comparative and fair tests. Children suggest the most appropriate scientific enquiry to use to answer questions.

 

In all Key Stages, there is an emphasis for children to observe changes in all aspects of nature overtime, in the forest area.

Long Term Overview

 

National Curriculum Aims

The national curriculum for science aims to ensure that all pupils:

  • develop scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding through the specific disciplines of biology, chemistry and physics.

It is vitally important that they develop secure understanding of each key block of knowledge and concepts in order to progress to the next stage. Pupils should be able to describe associated processes and key characteristics in common language, but they should also be familiar with, and use, technical terminology accurately and precisely. They should build up an extended specialist vocabulary. They should also apply their mathematical knowledge to their understanding of science, including collecting, presenting and analysing data.

 

  • develop understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science through different types of science enquiries that help them to answer scientific questions about the world around them.

‘Working scientifically’ specifies the understanding of the nature, processes and methods of science for each year group. It should not be taught as a separate strand. The notes and guidance give examples of how ‘working scientifically’ might be embedded within the content of biology, chemistry and physics, focusing on the key features of scientific enquiry, so that pupils learn to use a variety of approaches to answer relevant scientific questions. These types of scientific enquiry should include: observing over time; pattern seeking; identifying, classifying and grouping; comparative and fair testing (controlled investigations); and researching using secondary sources. Pupils should seek answers to questions through collecting, analysing and presenting data.

 

  • are equipped with the scientific knowledge required to understand the uses and implications of science, today and for the future.